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Snow White: A Graphic Novel

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Award-winning graphic novelist Matt Phelan delivers a darkly stylized noir Snow White set against the backdrop of Depression-era Manhattan. The scene: New York City, 1928. The dazzling lights cast shadows that grow ever darker as the glitzy prosperity of the Roaring Twenties screeches to a halt. Enter a cast of familiar characters: a young girl, Samantha White, returning af Award-winning graphic novelist Matt Phelan delivers a darkly stylized noir Snow White set against the backdrop of Depression-era Manhattan. The scene: New York City, 1928. The dazzling lights cast shadows that grow ever darker as the glitzy prosperity of the Roaring Twenties screeches to a halt. Enter a cast of familiar characters: a young girl, Samantha White, returning after being sent away by her cruel stepmother, the Queen of the Follies, years earlier; her father, the King of Wall Street, who survives the stock market crash only to suffer a strange and sudden death; seven street urchins, brave protectors for a girl as pure as snow; and a mysterious stock ticker that holds the stepmother in its thrall, churning out ticker tape imprinted with the wicked words "Another . . . More Beautiful . . . KILL." In a moody, cinematic new telling of a beloved fairy tale, extraordinary graphic novelist Matt Phelan captures the essence of classic film noir on the page—and draws a striking distinction between good and evil.


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Award-winning graphic novelist Matt Phelan delivers a darkly stylized noir Snow White set against the backdrop of Depression-era Manhattan. The scene: New York City, 1928. The dazzling lights cast shadows that grow ever darker as the glitzy prosperity of the Roaring Twenties screeches to a halt. Enter a cast of familiar characters: a young girl, Samantha White, returning af Award-winning graphic novelist Matt Phelan delivers a darkly stylized noir Snow White set against the backdrop of Depression-era Manhattan. The scene: New York City, 1928. The dazzling lights cast shadows that grow ever darker as the glitzy prosperity of the Roaring Twenties screeches to a halt. Enter a cast of familiar characters: a young girl, Samantha White, returning after being sent away by her cruel stepmother, the Queen of the Follies, years earlier; her father, the King of Wall Street, who survives the stock market crash only to suffer a strange and sudden death; seven street urchins, brave protectors for a girl as pure as snow; and a mysterious stock ticker that holds the stepmother in its thrall, churning out ticker tape imprinted with the wicked words "Another . . . More Beautiful . . . KILL." In a moody, cinematic new telling of a beloved fairy tale, extraordinary graphic novelist Matt Phelan captures the essence of classic film noir on the page—and draws a striking distinction between good and evil.

30 review for Snow White: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    3.5 stars. I kid you not when I say that it took me 5 minutes – no more, no less – to read this graphic novel. Why? Because it contains scarce series of dialogs. And that’s a problem, even though the aquarelle illustrations are beautiful, because it takes away from the substance of the story. When I say that the illustrations are pretty to look at, I do mean it, but they are also quite simple. It works to release a peculiar atmosphere which in return releases emotions inside the reader and enthrals 3.5 stars. I kid you not when I say that it took me 5 minutes – no more, no less – to read this graphic novel. Why? Because it contains scarce series of dialogs. And that’s a problem, even though the aquarelle illustrations are beautiful, because it takes away from the substance of the story. When I say that the illustrations are pretty to look at, I do mean it, but they are also quite simple. It works to release a peculiar atmosphere which in return releases emotions inside the reader and enthrals him/her, but if we compare this work to The Arrival by Shaun Tan, for instance, which contains no dialog at all, we can see the difference in quality. The Arrival is rich in world-building, whereas Snow White: A Graphic Novel has a different style, a simpler one, therefore the world-building is, too. But it’s charming and very worth the read. You won’t feel as if you wasted your time. I mean, remember it only took me 5 minutes to get to the finish line of this book. The best part is definitely analysing the alterations that were made to make this another version of the classic Snow White story. The dwarfs are adorable. Aside from the lovely Snow herself, they are what warms this cold dark – depressive, almost – retelling. It was impossible to slow down my reading pace, unless I wanted to take time to admire the graphics over and over again (which I would have done if they were more detailed), so this is truly my main problem with this book. Otherwise, it’s a book I’m pleased made its way into this world. If I were the sort of person to collect fairy-tales or share an undying love for graphic novels, I’d buy this without a flicker of thought. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’

  2. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    I’d have said it couldn’t be done. The Snow White fairytale has been told and retold and overdone to death until there’s not much left to do but forget about it entirely. Not that every graphic novel out there has to be based on an original idea. And not that the world is fed up with fairytales now (it isn’t). But when I heard about Matt Phelan’s Snow White: A Graphic Novel I was willing to give it a chance simply because I trusted its creator and not its material. The crazy thing is that even b I’d have said it couldn’t be done. The Snow White fairytale has been told and retold and overdone to death until there’s not much left to do but forget about it entirely. Not that every graphic novel out there has to be based on an original idea. And not that the world is fed up with fairytales now (it isn’t). But when I heard about Matt Phelan’s Snow White: A Graphic Novel I was willing to give it a chance simply because I trusted its creator and not its material. The crazy thing is that even before I picked it up, it threw me for a loop. I heard that the story was recast in 1920s/ early-1930s Depression-era New York City. For longer than I’d care to admit I just sort of sat there, wracking my brain and trying desperately to remember anything I’d ever seen that was similar. I’ve seen fairytales set during the Depression before, but never Snow White. Then I picked the book up and was struck immediately by how beautiful it was. Finally I read through it and almost every element clicked into place like the gears of a clock. I know Matt Phelan has won a Scott O’Dell Award for The Storm in the Barn and I know his books get far and wide acclaim. Forget all that. This book is his piece de resistance. A bit of fairytale telling, to lure in the kids, and a whole whopping dollop of cinematic noir, deft storytelling, and clever creation, all set against a white, wintery backdrop. The hardened detective thinks he’s seen it all, but that was before he encountered the corpse in the window of a department store, laid out like she was sleeping. No one could account for her. No one except maybe the boy keeping watch from across the street. When the detective asks for the story he doesn’t get what he wants, but we, the readers, do. Back in time we zip to when a little girl lost her mother to illness and later her father fell desperately in love with a dancer widely proclaimed to be the “Queen of the Follies.” Sent away to a boarding school, the girl returns years later when her father has died and his will leaves all his money in a trust to Snow. Blinded by rage, the stepmother (who is not innocent in her husband’s death) calls in a favor with a former stagehand to do away with her pretty impediment, but he can’t do the deed. What follows is a gripping tale the seven street kids that take Snow under their wing (or is it the other way around?), some stage make-up, a syringe, an apple, and an ending so sweet you could have gotten it out of a fairytale. Let’s get back to this notion I have that the idea of setting Snow White during the Depression in New York is original. It honestly goes above and beyond the era. I could swear I’d never read or seen a version where the seven dwarfs were seven street kids. Or where the evil stepmother was a star of the Ziegfeld Follies. Snow’s run from Mr. Hunt is through Central Park through various shantytowns and he presents the stepmother with a heart that's a pig’s procured at a butcher. Even making her glass coffin a window at Macy’s, or the magic mirror an insidious ticker tape, feels original and perfectly in keeping with the setting. You begin to wonder how no one else has ever thought to do this before. You’d also be forgiven for reading the book, walking away, giving it a year, and then remembering it as wordless. It isn’t, but Phelan’s choosy with his wordplay this time. Always a fan of silent sequences, I was struck by the times we do see words. Whether it’s the instructions on the ticker tape (a case could easily be made that these instructions are entirely in the increasingly deranged step-mother’s mind), Snow’s speech about how snow beautifies everything, or the moment when each one of the boys tells her his name, Phelan’s judiciousness makes the book powerful time and time again. Can you imagine what it would have felt like if there had been an omniscient narrator? The skin on the back of my neck shudders at the thought. For all that the words are few and far between, you often get a very good sense of the characters anyway. Snow’s a little bit Maria Von Trapp and a little bit Mary Poppins to the boys. I would have liked Phelan to give her a bit more agency than, say, Disney did. For example, when her step-mother informs her, after the reading of her father’s will, that her old room is no longer her own, I initially misread Snow’s response to be that she was going out to find a new home on her own. Instead, she’s just going for a walk and gets tracked down by Mr. Hunt in the process. It felt like a missed beat, but not something that sinks the ship. Contrast that with the evil stepmother. Without ever being graphic about it, not even once, this lady just exudes sex. It’s kind of hard to explain. There’s that moment when the old stagehand remembers when he once turned his own body into a step stool so that she could make her grand entrance during a show. There’s also her first entrance in the Follies, fully clothed but so luscious you can understand why Snow’s father would fall for her. The book toys with the notion that the man is bewitched rather than acting of his own accord, but it never gives you an answer to that question one way or another. Lest we forget, the city itself is also a character. Having lived in NYC for eleven years, I’ve always been very touchy about how it’s portrayed in books for kids. When contemporary books are filled with alleyways it makes me mighty suspicious. Old timey fare gets a pass, though. Clever too of Phelan to set the book during the winter months. As Snow says at one point, “snow covers everything and makes the entire world beautiful . . . This city is beautiful, too. It has its own magic.” So we get Art Deco interiors, and snow covered city tops seen out of huge plate glass windows. We get theaters full of gilt and splendor and the poverty of Hoovervilles in the park, burning trashcans and all. It felt good. It felt right. It felt authentic. I could live there again. We live in a blessed time for graphic novels. With the recent win of what may well be the first graphic novel to win a National Book Award, they are respected, flourishing, and widely read. Yet for all that, the graphic novels written for children are not always particularly beautiful to the eye. Aesthetics take time. A beautiful comic is also a lot more time consuming than one done freehand in Photoshop. All the more true if that comic has been done almost entirely in watercolors as Phelan has here. I don’t think that there’s a soul alive who could pick up this book and not find it beautiful. What’s interesting is how Phelan balances the Art Deco motifs with the noir-ish scenes and shots. When we think of noir graphic novels we tend to think of those intensely violent and very adult classics like Sin City. Middle grade noir is almost unheard of at this point. Here, the noir is in the tone and feel of the story. It’s far more than just the black and white images, though those help too in their way. The limited color palette, similar in many ways to The Storm in the Barn with how it uses color, here invokes the movies of the past. He always has a reason, that Matt Phelan. His judicious use of color is sparing and soaked with meaning. The drops of blood, often referred to in the original fairytale as having sprung from the queen’s finger when she pricked herself while sewing, is re-imagined as drops of bright red blood on a handkerchief and the pure white snow, a sure sign of influenza. Red can be lips or an apple or cheeks in the cold. Phelan draws scenes in blue or brown or black and white to indicate when you’re watching a memory or a different moment in time, and it’s very effective and easy to follow. And then there’s the last scene, done entirely in warm, gentle, full-color watercolors. It does the heart good to see. The thing about Matt Phelan is that he rarely does the same story twice. About the only thing you can count on with him is that he loves history and the past. Indeed, between showing off a young Buster Keaton ( Bluffton) and a ravaged Dust Bowl setting (The Storm in the Barn) it’s possible “Snow White” is just an extension of his favorite era. As much a paean to movies as it is fairytales and graphic novels, Phelan limits his word count and pulls off a tale with truly striking visuals and killer emotional resonance. I don’t think I’ve ever actually enjoyed the story of Snow White until now. Hand this book to graphic novel fans, fairytale fans, and any kid who’s keen on good triumphing over evil. There might be one or two such children out there. This book is for them. For ages 9-12.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kelli

    I may have sighed when I opened this one. My son has been watching Once Upon a Time on Netflix and I’m kinda all set on Snow White these days. This, however, is a creative retelling of the original tale. Once the dwarfs appear, the story takes on a warmth I never realized from the original. Unique and quite well done. 4.5 stars

  4. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I am a fan of the rich, sensitive, image-based storytelling of Matt Phelan. He’s nostalgic, he loves history, and loves to create historical fiction, rendering stories with such quiet intensity it is hard to think most video-gaming children will appreciate them, but I think of them as all ages picturebooks and graphic novels. Not easily categorizable, which is good, he’s himself, this Phelan. Who is almost equally tween and teen, illustrator and graphic novelist? Check out Bluffton: My Summers w I am a fan of the rich, sensitive, image-based storytelling of Matt Phelan. He’s nostalgic, he loves history, and loves to create historical fiction, rendering stories with such quiet intensity it is hard to think most video-gaming children will appreciate them, but I think of them as all ages picturebooks and graphic novels. Not easily categorizable, which is good, he’s himself, this Phelan. Who is almost equally tween and teen, illustrator and graphic novelist? Check out Bluffton: My Summers with Buster Keaton (set in Western Michigan in 1908); The Storm in the Barn, set in the Dust Bowl and Around the World, set in the late nineteenth century. Snow White is a revision of the familiar fairy tale, which you don’t hav to have read to appreciate it as a story, but if you have read it, it might enrich this telling, because Phelan gives you few words. He lets the images do most of the telling, many silent pages, which I love, love, love. The story is set in New York City, 1928, Jazz Age. Samantha White is our Snow; Her Dad dies in the stock market crash time and wicked step mom is no help, of course. Seven street urchins are the dwarves, protectors. The feel of it is early talky black white films, or silent films, with Phelan’s gorgeous signature pencil drawings and watercolors. It’s a short telling, but not slight; it’s rich and evokes good and evil in a time of financial collapse, as we have experienced recently, and will again. In other words, it’s historical fiction, which is also at its best about now. Snow White is magic, it’s fantasy, but Phelan spins this magic, his magic, in the context of a world we know and recognize, with emotional resonance. Lovely.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    This story was very short. It had very minimal dialogue and this made the story hard to follow, even though there were plenty of pictures. It just made the story feel sort of choppy. However, the art was very beautiful, so that helped bump the rating up just a little bit.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chessa

    I was convinced for about 2/3rds of this book that it would be a 3-star read, but it won me over in the end. A beautiful, impressionistic retelling of the classic fairy-tale, set in depression-era NY. I loved, SO MUCH, the recasting of Snow White's 7 Dwarves. I don't want to say too much, because spoilers. But it was a great choice. The feminist in me wishes that there could have been a retelling of the saving of Snow, but I guess we'll just chalk it up to magic and leave it. The wavy, watercolor a I was convinced for about 2/3rds of this book that it would be a 3-star read, but it won me over in the end. A beautiful, impressionistic retelling of the classic fairy-tale, set in depression-era NY. I loved, SO MUCH, the recasting of Snow White's 7 Dwarves. I don't want to say too much, because spoilers. But it was a great choice. The feminist in me wishes that there could have been a retelling of the saving of Snow, but I guess we'll just chalk it up to magic and leave it. The wavy, watercolor art of the book is beautiful and creates a dream-like atmosphere. In some scenes, it was frustrating because I was unsure of what I was seeing or why. But, dreams are like that, I guess. On the whole, it works beautifully. I would recommend this for any fans of fairy tale retellings. Safe for all ages.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate Willis

    I read this at the library. Very interesting illustrations and a fun twist on the classic story! Unfortunately, since it is in the film noir style, some of the illustrations are a little graphic and scary. (It may also be closer to the Grimm version than the Disney one, which does make a difference.) ;) The equivalent of the seven dwarves were sooo cute!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    A fairly straight-forward retelling of Snow White, set in the late 1920s. The illustrations are beautiful, and the whole is very sparing on dialog. Interestingly, Phelan chose to borrow a lot from Disney's version, enough so that it almost reads as an adaptation of an adaptation at times.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rashika (is tired)

    This one is really hard to rate it because while I really enjoyed the graphic novel, I also think it needed more substance. a better review to possibly come in the future?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    I'm not sure what I expected when I picked up this graphic novel, but it wasn't what I got. I love the art, and the setting of this classic story in New York City, circa 1928, is a brilliant idea. The plot does not stray far from the Disney adaptation, and the casting of Snow and the seven street urchins was quite fun. There is so little dialog, that this might almost be a wordless picture book, and while the art is wonderful, I found the story itself just OK. So, 4 stars for the art, and 2 for I'm not sure what I expected when I picked up this graphic novel, but it wasn't what I got. I love the art, and the setting of this classic story in New York City, circa 1928, is a brilliant idea. The plot does not stray far from the Disney adaptation, and the casting of Snow and the seven street urchins was quite fun. There is so little dialog, that this might almost be a wordless picture book, and while the art is wonderful, I found the story itself just OK. So, 4 stars for the art, and 2 for the story, averages out at 3.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    I received a copy of Snow White from Walker Books Australia to review. I love fairy-tale retellings so I was excited to read a graphic novel retelling. I still need to read the original fairy-tale though… I don’t know much about the pre-Depression era in America so it was interesting to see a version of Snow White told during that time. Even though that wasn’t the focus of the story. I really liked the illustrations in this, they were beautiful and very film noir which I’ve never seen in a graphic I received a copy of Snow White from Walker Books Australia to review. I love fairy-tale retellings so I was excited to read a graphic novel retelling. I still need to read the original fairy-tale though… I don’t know much about the pre-Depression era in America so it was interesting to see a version of Snow White told during that time. Even though that wasn’t the focus of the story. I really liked the illustrations in this, they were beautiful and very film noir which I’ve never seen in a graphic novel before. Although I don’t read a lot of graphic novels so that may be why… I don’t think there’s a lot I can say about this, other that I liked it. The story was really faced paced but that’s because it’s only 280+ pages and is a graphic novel so there isn’t much to read. I think it’s a great book for any fan of the original fairy-tales or Snow White that is very hard to buy for.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Agnė

    2.5 out of 5 For a retelling of Snow White, I expected more. It's basically the same Disneyfied version (hapless heroine and happily ever after included) in the new setting (New York City in 1920s-1930s). Although twists on the glass coffin as (view spoiler)[Macy's window (hide spoiler)] and the seven dwarfs as (view spoiler)[street kids (hide spoiler)] were quite clever, other twists didn't really work for me (view spoiler)[e.g., the ticker tape instead of the enchanted mirror (hide spoiler)] . A 2.5 out of 5 For a retelling of Snow White, I expected more. It's basically the same Disneyfied version (hapless heroine and happily ever after included) in the new setting (New York City in 1920s-1930s). Although twists on the glass coffin as (view spoiler)[Macy's window (hide spoiler)] and the seven dwarfs as (view spoiler)[street kids (hide spoiler)] were quite clever, other twists didn't really work for me (view spoiler)[e.g., the ticker tape instead of the enchanted mirror (hide spoiler)] . And is it just me who thinks it's rather weird that (view spoiler)[a detective is kissing a presumably dead girl on the crime scene (hide spoiler)] ? I know this graphic novel is getting a lot of praise for the illustrations but, unfortunately, even this aspect of Snow White didn't impress me that much. Yes, the artwork fits the mood of the 1930s NYC well and it does have a cinematic feel. Oh, and I do love the use of color: But I guess, Phelan's illustrations in Snow White are just too sketchy for my taste. Since there aren't many words used, I would appreciate more detail to invite my eyes to linger a little.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary Catelli

    A retelling of the tale. Set in Great Depression New York City. The seven dwarves are in fact seven little boys, street urchins. Amazing how faithful you can get in a (mostly?) mundane tale. Art has its interesting aspects.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Hannah

    I don't know why people don't do interesting retellings of this one more often. Really good.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jen | Jen Talks Audiobooks

    Just gorgeous.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    A beautiful retelling set in 1930's depression era New York, with just a hint of magic. Popsugar Challenge 2017: a bestseller from a genre you don't normally read (Graphic Novel)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Leitschuh

    A beautiful new take on the classic Snow White story. Set in 1920s New York. I loved the gorgeous illustrations!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elevetha

    **An ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review* *Re-read Nov 2016 with finished product.* I guess what I assumed were rough black and white sketches back when I read this through Netgalley were actually the final products. They did look nicer in the published paper copy vs grainy e-book, but I would have liked a few panels to be a little more clear. I loved certain elements of the story, especially how the Seven "dwarfs" were done and how the "p **An ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review* *Re-read Nov 2016 with finished product.* I guess what I assumed were rough black and white sketches back when I read this through Netgalley were actually the final products. They did look nicer in the published paper copy vs grainy e-book, but I would have liked a few panels to be a little more clear. I loved certain elements of the story, especially how the Seven "dwarfs" were done and how the "prince" was handled. I do wish some other elements had been more clearly explained, such as the ticker tape machine. Also, I do wish we'd gotten a better sense of the characters and their personalities; just more of a focus on them and more time getting to know them. I did like all the good guys, but they didn't really come alive for me, as it were. That ending was pretty perfect though!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Irene McHugh

    If you like film noir, this adaptation is for you. Most of the art is black & white with intentional splashes of red and a few other colors. Story begins in 1918 moving through the Roaring 20s and Great Depression in the Big Apple of NYC. Phelan cleverly uses this urban setting to tell Snow White's story and explore class relationships. Snow's relationship with the "dwarfs" here is much more meaningful than the Disneyfied version. A quick read that had me rethinking several aspects of the st If you like film noir, this adaptation is for you. Most of the art is black & white with intentional splashes of red and a few other colors. Story begins in 1918 moving through the Roaring 20s and Great Depression in the Big Apple of NYC. Phelan cleverly uses this urban setting to tell Snow White's story and explore class relationships. Snow's relationship with the "dwarfs" here is much more meaningful than the Disneyfied version. A quick read that had me rethinking several aspects of the story of Snow White, both the Grimm version and Disney one.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

    Absolutely beautiful.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    Actual Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars I literally just picked this up from the library because I saw someone mention it on booktube once. This was seriously the quickest graphic novel I've read (it literally felt like I was reading the dankest children's book). I did, however find it quite enjoyable. It was a new take on a fairytale and it was a delight to read. The 7 dwarves seriously stole the show! The made it a lot more interesting and engaging as well. I just wish that it was longer and we spent Actual Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars I literally just picked this up from the library because I saw someone mention it on booktube once. This was seriously the quickest graphic novel I've read (it literally felt like I was reading the dankest children's book). I did, however find it quite enjoyable. It was a new take on a fairytale and it was a delight to read. The 7 dwarves seriously stole the show! The made it a lot more interesting and engaging as well. I just wish that it was longer and we spent more time with the characters. This is (literally) a work of art!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Serethiel

    A lovely Snow White retelling. I loved all the pretty illustrations. ^_^

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melanti

    A middle-grade graphic novel retelling Snow White, (more the Disney than the original) set in New York during the late 20s-early 30s. Snow White's father is a stock broker who managed not to go broke in the crash. The evil step-mother is a greedy gold-digging actress. The magic mirror is magic ticker tape. The forest is Hooverville... IT shouldn't work. At all. But it does. I have no idea how, but it works very well. Not a huge fan of the artwork, but the lack of dialog did make me pay more atte A middle-grade graphic novel retelling Snow White, (more the Disney than the original) set in New York during the late 20s-early 30s. Snow White's father is a stock broker who managed not to go broke in the crash. The evil step-mother is a greedy gold-digging actress. The magic mirror is magic ticker tape. The forest is Hooverville... IT shouldn't work. At all. But it does. I have no idea how, but it works very well. Not a huge fan of the artwork, but the lack of dialog did make me pay more attention to it than I do most Graphic novels.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Priya

    Thoroughly enjoyed this noir version of Snow White by Matt Phelan. Here the story is set against the backdrop of pre depression Manhattan era. The characters are well crafted in this environment. The evil queen is a broadway actress and dwarves are street urchins idolizing Snow White. The artwork is amazing and I found this book in the Seattle Public Library in the children's section. Worth a read!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christina (Ensconced in Lit)

    I was excited to receive this book (I won it in an Armchair BEA giveaway so no pressure to review), because I have grown to love the graphical novel media and who doesn't like fairy tales reinterpreted? Snow White by Matt Phelan takes full advantage of this medium and like another blogger eloquently stated, it really does play like a film on paper. Phelan has a knack for when picture versus dialogue fits, although part of me would have enjoyed a bit more dialogue. The pictures are gorgeous, and I was excited to receive this book (I won it in an Armchair BEA giveaway so no pressure to review), because I have grown to love the graphical novel media and who doesn't like fairy tales reinterpreted? Snow White by Matt Phelan takes full advantage of this medium and like another blogger eloquently stated, it really does play like a film on paper. Phelan has a knack for when picture versus dialogue fits, although part of me would have enjoyed a bit more dialogue. The pictures are gorgeous, and I love the reframing of the story in the early 1900's with the drama from that era. The beautiful wicked actress as the Queen, the sweet girl as Snow White, and the 7 urchins as the dwarfs. I loved the moment where the urchins find her and tell her something that is poignant and moving in the latter half of the book. I also like how the book finished. It was a quick read and I made my way through it in less than 30 minutes but it was definitely worth the journey. My issues were that some of the pictures since they were low resolution for the ARC and not in color were confusing, and I have a feeling it will be much more clear in the final version. Also, Snow White is depicted as sort of a brainless, too innocent girl, which may be close to the fairy tale version, but I like women MC's to have a bit more backbone. That said, the book delivers what was promised, and I love the imagination that Phelan brings to the page artistically.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    As far as the retelling goes, it was clever! There really wasn't anything new to the story, you immediately know that Samantha White is Snow, her papa will die, her stepmother is wicked. I did enjoy how the dwarves became seven street urchins though! When all is said and done, I liked this one, though I don't have much to say here: it's Snow White set during the Jazz Age. What's not to like? For more thoughts head over to The Pretty Good Gatsby!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    A new twist with the age old story set in a different time. Perfect amount of words in a noir-like setting. Matt has found a fan in me. Must read!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cori Reed

    I had zero expectations going into this graphic novel and I really really enjoyed it. A very simple retelling of Snow White set in 1920's New York. The art was lovely and I felt genuinely drawn into this world even though this is a very quick read. Well done.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I loved the setting of this version and I liked the style of the art a lot. Overall, I think this was a pretty good adaptation of Snow White and wouldn't mind reading a longer novel like it. I do wish there was more dialogue, but it didn't ruin the story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Lower

    Snow White graphic novel set in the roaring 20's. Fantastic! There were several well thought out elements in this book. The use of color to emphasize elements of the story was great. The storytelling was great. I just was enthralled by it!

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